Arlington Group Events LLC
Arlington Group Events LLC
Quality Events for Northern Nevada





Carson City History and more...


Stories You Can't Resist


HISTORIC CARSON PHOTOS
A diverse collection of vintage Carson City imagery. View photos...

OLD STUMP
There is living in Carson City a famous old cat who is generally known by the significant cognomen "Stump." This name was given him because of a shortcoming of the caudal appendage. Stump has also "bob ears." It is a matter of wonder to me why he is not called by the latter instead of the former name. Read more...

SAZERAC BULL AND BEAR
"Old Dad" related his "experience" in the circus business in the Sazerac Lying Club one night:   It was in the early days of Carson City . Money was more plentiful than mosquitoes on the Carson River; gambling was as common as praying at camp meeting, and whisky as free as water. But the boys pined for a little excitement, and "Dad," who in those days was a moneyed prince, concluded to give it to them, and at the same time-make a nice little clean-up for himself. Read more...

AN EXCITING STAGE RIDE

In 1909, Idah M. Strobridge wrote The Land of Purple Shadows, about her life in pioneering California and Nevada. One chapter of her book, "In the Days of Hank Monk," describes a midwinter trip she and her mother took, during the Civil War, from San Francisco to an unnamed mining town on the other side of the Sierra. It had rained hard and continuously for two weeks. The woman and her small girl rode a steamer to Sacramento and then a railroad train to Latrobe. Read more...

RIDING HIGH: HANK MONK and HORACE GREELEY

Did one of the most famous rides in American history cost a presidential candidate the race for the nation’s highest office? As the story goes, New York Tribune editor Horace Greeley’s stagecoach ride with the colorful Hank Monk at the reins later played a major role in Greeley’s loss to incumbent Ulysses S. Grant in the 1872 presidential election. Read more...


FINDING A FOUNDING FATHER
Historians have long been aware of one small but glaring hole in the well-documented history of Nevada’s capital city: There was no known photo of one of the city’s four founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin Green. In fact, they’d resigned themselves to the likelihood no such picture existed. Read more...

RIDING THE FLUME
Every year, mountain bikers flock to Lake Tahoe's East Shore, eager to ride the old Flume Trail. Littered with wooden planks from a 19th century water flume, this narrow pathway hugs the steep west slope of the Carson Range. It challenges the courage and endurance of adventuresome cyclists. The ride also rewards the brave with some of Lake Tahoe's most spectacular views. Although a ride along the Flume Trail can stir the heart, the real excitement associated with flumes ended more than a century ago. Read more...

ABE CURRY'S SANDSTONE EAGLE

Fred Nietz has been on a treasure hunt lately. Fred is a principal of Arlington Group, an organization that is responsible for coordinating events in Carson City, including spearheading activities to celebrate Carson City's Sesquicentennial in 2008. Fred is also a sometime contributor to this site. The treasure in question is one of Carson City's forgotten relics, the "sandstone" eagle of Abe Curry. It is pictured above, right after its restoration in the 1970s. Right before it disappeared from public view. Fred sent along some pictures and notes, and wanted me to share the story of the eagle with you. Read more...


THE WASHOE ZEPHYR
Mark Twain wrote in Roughing It: "We were approaching the end of our long journey. It was the morning of the twentieth day. At noon we would reach Carson City, the capital of Nevada Territory. We were not glad, but sorry. It had been a fine pleasure trip; we had fed fat on wonders every day; we were now well accustomed to stage life, and very fond of it; so the idea of coming to a stand-still and settling down to a humdrum existence in a village was not agreeable, but on the contrary depressing." Read more...


FROM MEDICINE TO JAZZ - THE TJADER STORY
Dr. Anton Tjader was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1825. In 1854 and 1855 he served as a surgeon in the Russian Army during the Crimean Wars. Afterwards he immigrated to America. He enrolled in the Harvard Medical School, from where he received his M.D. in 1857. After graduation he started working at the U.S. Marine Hospital in Chelsea, Massachusetts. In 1859 he left on a wagon train to travel west. Read more...


SLIDE MOUNTAIN, NEVADA 1983
At about noon on May 30, 1983, a large complex rock and soil slide detached from the southeast face of Slide Mountain, Nevada. Read more...


MYRON ANGEL AND MAJOR ORMSBY
Myron and Eugene were first cousins of David Fairchild's children. It was, on the Fairchild side, as their mother was Eunice Fairchild, the sister of David Fairchild. Read more...


IDAH MEACHAM STROBRIDGE
Idah Meacham was an only child, born on June 9, 1855, to parents who were ranching at Moraga Valley, California. While still a young, impressionable girl, she moved with her family which homesteaded a ranch in northern Nevada at Lassen Meadows about halfway between Winnemucca and Lovelock. There her father built the Humboldt House, a popular hotel and cafe, which served as a rest stop for many travelers passing through Nevada from all over the country and the world. In Idah’s everyday life she watched wagon trains headed west, the new railroad bringing more homesteaders, Mexican vaqueros, Chinese placer miners and Native Americans from the Paiute and Bannock tribes. Read more...


  MUCH 'JOLLIFICATION' TOOK PLACE AT UNCLE TRED'S PARK
The park was originated by Treadway in about 1861 as a private park, but open to the public. We (Carson City) had no public parks at that time. Read more...


ED PARSONS and THE REVENGE of THE GREAT PELICAN
Sometime in the late 1970s, I wondered what emergency required my phone to ring at 6 a.m. on a Saturday in November. It was my college fraternity brother and fishing partner Ed Parsons. Read more...


THE SHOOTIST REUNION - April 21, 2001 - Carson City, Nevada
25th Anniversary of the filming of The Shootist in Carson City, Nevada.
The Shootist flashed into Glendon Swarthout's imagination early one Arizona evening in 1973 while shaving before going out in Scottsdale, their hometown. My dad told my mother, Kathryn, "Hold on, I just had a terrific idea. We're gonna be a little late for the party." He then sat down at his desk and ... Read more...

GUNPLAY at CONVICT LAKE
The Nevada State Prison in Carson City was the residence of a cadre of unsavory characters in 1871. Nearly 70 men were serving sentences ranging from murder to train robbery to arson, rape, assault and burglary. These were not nice men. ... Read more...

CHINESE in NINETEENTH-CENTURY NEVADA
A mere twenty-one Chinese men lived in the western Great Basin in 1860. It was a humble beginning for immigrants who would compete for the title of largest immigrant group in nineteenth-century Nevada. One of the earliest descriptions of Chinese in the region places them in 1856 digging a ditch along the Carson River. Some of the immigrants remained in the area, working gold-bearing placer deposits. They became such a fixture there that people called the nearby community Chinatown before it officially took the name Dayton in 1861. Read more...

JOHN BRACKEN MANKINS
Early Nevada--in this case western Utah Territory--had its share of hardscrabble pioneers whose lives on the frontier are marked by some mystery. Two that come quickly to mind are James “Old Virginny” Finney and the man we are honoring today John Bracken Mankins. Read more...



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